After the Storm

 The minisuper a block away from our house.

The minisuper a block away from our house.

Wednesday, September 17th

It’s been five days since I have left the house. Our friends who live in Todos Santos, drove all the way out to see us to make sure we were okay—as they couldn’t call. We were quite touched by their efforts and concern. They brought their two kids so Emilio got to have a spontaneous play date. Lucas ventured out yesterday to see how his mother and sister are. They have no power or running water, but their spirits are high. They had damage to their palapa, but it mostly remains, with a few holes. Everything got wet, but few things were ruined. Lucas’ sister Emily, and her boyfriend, Agus spent last season working very hard on building themselves a general store (called MiniSuper Munchies) out of wood, and a roof to protect the trailer where they live. Agustin is Argentian, and learned to build the Argentinian way—which is very strong, and weather proof. The strength of the posts (with a 4 foot deep foundation) supporting the metal roof prevented the trailer from blowing away (which is what happened to most trailers we later found out). So their home remains intact. Their store—which was constructed of all wood is also miraculously left untouched. Their store had not yet opened, but their plan is to open in the fall season which starts in November. Lucas heard through the grapevine, as only one person in our community can get connectivity—that the winds were 185 miles an hour and that the devastation in Cabo is catastrophic. Destruction, looting, mayhem and homelessness. Our one Cabo friend that was home during the hurricane, we learned via Facebook, is okay. 

 

Thursday, September 18th

I finally left the house yesterday—we all got in the car and visited Pescadero and Todos Santos. I was not able to get online. I took videos and photos of everything I could. I hugged the few friends that were around and Lucas’ family. It was comforting to see other people again. We still had no idea if there would be gas, water or food available. We found a makeshift store that was selling food, and Lucas grabbed everything he could. We were concerned about toilet paper. He found a few rolls. A lot of houses were destroyed, or partially destroyed, but then a lot weren’t. People’s spirits seemed high—the people who live in Baja are used to service interruption and are used to their homes being in a state of incompletion. Family is mostly what matters here. And having beer. We heard that beer was scarce, and that the government would not be resupplying beer because it was a state of emergency.  This was not good news.

 

We also checked out the area around Elias Calles. See photos below.

 The Elias Calles valley, with the arroyo (dry river bed) filled with rainwater.

The Elias Calles valley, with the arroyo (dry river bed) filled with rainwater.

 The Elias Calles Jardin de Niños (where Emilio attends school) has a missing roof and wall.

The Elias Calles Jardin de Niños (where Emilio attends school) has a missing roof and wall.

 Drying out our clothes while there is sun available.

Drying out our clothes while there is sun available.

 A palapa that did not fare well near the beach in Elias Calles.

A palapa that did not fare well near the beach in Elias Calles.

 A restaurant on the highway that had just finished completion a few weeks before the storm.

A restaurant on the highway that had just finished completion a few weeks before the storm.